12″ – 18″ tall American Elm fast growing shade tree “Herbie”, Yarmouth, ME Clone

December 20, 2019 - Comment

American Liberty Elm – Cloned from famous “Herbie”, Yarmouth, Maine . Planted 1790s. * Fast growing shade tree. Will grow to 100 ft in 100 years.* Each “Herbie” is registered and will come with a brass “Herbie” tag, a ten year warranty certificate against Dutch elm disease and complete planting, pruning and care instructions.* 12″

American Liberty Elm – Cloned from famous “Herbie”, Yarmouth, Maine . Planted 1790s. * Fast growing shade tree. Will grow to 100 ft in 100 years.* Each “Herbie” is registered and will come with a brass “Herbie” tag, a ten year warranty certificate against Dutch elm disease and complete planting, pruning and care instructions.* 12″ – 18″ tall trees are shipped in 4 inch pots. * Shipped by Federal Express. For those who are descendants of Mayflower passengers who plan to celebrate in 2020 we offer a 10″ x 6″ cast bronze plaque, mounted on granite, with 3 lines of personal message of commemoration written by the purchaser. The message will be seen by children and grandchildren for generations to come. There is an extra charge for the custom plaque. Herbie Story: “Herbie”, Yarmouth, Maine’s famous elm tree, made international headlines, when as the oldest and largest elm in New England he was cut down. Planted in the 1790s, at 110 ft. in height, “Herbie” towered over the town of Yarmouth. He measured over 20 ft. in circumference. They once said it took 5 people to hug “Herbie.”Named by children who walked beneath his boughs on the way to school, “Herbie” could be seen rising above the tree line from miles away. For centuries he survived hurricanes and repeated infections of Dutch elm disease, the deadly fungus which wiped out America’s favorite shade tree 50 years ago. Finally weakened with storm damage and age, the 200+ year old “Herbie” became a liability and in 2010 was taken down. Beginning 10 years before “Herbie’s” death, Elm Research Institute (ERI), Keene, NH, collected cuttings from “Herbie” in an effort to preserve this centuries old legacy. Like many cancer patients, he was a “survivor. We wanted to make every effort to reproduce “Herbie” hoping his clones would prove equally resistant to Dutch elm disease.

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