Bristlecone Pine – Pinus flexilis – 7-10 inch live tree – Excellent for bonsai

December 15, 2019 - Comment

LeBeau Bamboo NurseryGrower of 500+ varieties!Inspected and licensed by the Oregon Department of AgricultureCombined shipping for multiple plant ordersShipping is $8.49 plus 50 cents for each additional plant (listings for bundles qualify as a single plant)→ Find More Plant Varieties For Discounted ShippingPlanting and early care instructions sent with each order.Pinus flexilis – Limber PineAverage

LeBeau Bamboo NurseryGrower of 500+ varieties!Inspected and licensed by the Oregon Department of AgricultureCombined shipping for multiple plant ordersShipping is $8.49 plus 50 cents for each additional plant (listings for bundles qualify as a single plant)→ Find More Plant Varieties For Discounted ShippingPlanting and early care instructions sent with each order.Pinus flexilis – Limber PineAverage Height: 20-30 feet in landscapes Hardiness: Zones 4-7 Aspect: Sun or light shade Plant Spacing: 10+ ft apartDeer Resistance: 5/5 – Very deer resistant! Leaves: evergreenShipping Restrictions: Can not ship to California, Montana, or Hawaii The Limber Pine is an extremely tough species found through the Rocky Mountains from New Mexico to Canada where it can survive on mountain peaks at higher elevations than other tree species can grow. It is similar to the closely related Whitebark Pine (Pinus albicaulis) and also has a similar habit to the Bristlecone Pines which are more distantly related. The Limber Pine is an excellent choice for bonsai because of its short needles, thick trunk, and dense branches. It also develops far more branches near the base of the tree than most other conifer species. Trees develop thick foliage and an upright habit when grown under normal low elevation conditions, but at high elevations Limber Pines develop twisted, gnarled forms from extreme wind and heavy snow loads. Each tree is very unique in its appearance and often develops a trunk several feet in diameter even though the tree only reaches five or six feet tall. Bonsai enthusiasts often recreate this contorted and flattened habit with this species but it can also be done on a larger scale in the landscape with regular and careful pruning. Like other high elevation pines the Limber Pine prefers well drained soil and full sun, although some shade is okay. If you don’t have well drained soil try creating a soil mound four to five feet wide and three feet tall and plant the tree on top of the mound as this will provide the roots with extra drainage. A twisted and flattened Limber Pine growing on a rocky ridge with no soilSource: Commons A large Limber Pine with multiple trunksSource: Commons The trunk develops a gnarled appearance as trees ageSource: Commons Limber Pines growing on a high elevation ridge where no other tree species can surviveSource: Commons Limber Pines growing on the edge of a cliffSource: Commons These Limber Pines are the only plant able to grow in this desolate soil Source: Commons Limber Pines growing just above the tree line of other conifer species Source: Commons Close up of the short needlesSource: Commons A Limber Pine in a more protected location where it is allowed to grow uprightSource: CommonsHow Your Plants Are ShippedWoody and perennial plants are usually shipped by removing the plant from its container and washing the soil away. They are then bundled together and wrapped in wet paper and plastic to keep the roots moist but the tops dry to prevent rot. Plants that grow from tubers, rhizomes, crowns, and bulbs like Dahlias, Grasses, Ferns, Daylilies, and Peonies are often pruned back and sent padded in a bag full of sawdust. Typically these plants are available only for dormant shipping in late fall, winter, or early spring but a few species are available for summer shipping as well. After the roots are washed of soil, the bundles look like this. Pictured are 10 Giant Coast Redwood in the 1 gallon size. Late in the season, these plants are often 3 feet tall! In this picture, the roots are 8 inches long. The bundle of plants is wrapped in paper to pad the roots from damage and keep them moist. For large plants, paper shreds are added to fill in gaps in the larger root structure. The bundles are soaked in water and then bagged. The top of the bag is taped shut and the tops of the plant are left dry. Your plants will be placed into tight fitting boxes to prevent the plants from shifting around during transit. They will also be secured to the bottom of the box with a piece of tape. Then they are ready to go!Bamboo Plants Are Shipped In Their Container – Will be sent either UPS or USPS depending on plant sizesPlants that are shipped in their containers have their container wrapped in plastic to keep the soil from falling away and are then strapped to the bottom of the box. This prevents the plants from moving around even if the boxes are dropped or turned upside down. One gallon bamboo plants boxed, strapped, and ready to be sealed. Our most common boxes fit 8, 12, and 17 plants tight and snug. Smaller boxes also fit one or two plants tight and snug.Bamboo plants are shipped in their container because they don’t like root disturbance and bare root shipping would cause a lot of damage. Most other plants do just fine with bare root shipping because their roots are more flexible and less likely to break during transit. Small sized plants, usually in one and two gallon containers, can be shipped during the active growing season while larger plants are delayed until they are dormant in the fall and are shipped until spring.Plant GuaranteeWe have many years of experience shipping plants and have fine-tuned our methods to ensure the highest success, but shipping anything across the county has challenges and this is especially true for plants. If any of your plants arrive damaged please contact us for replacements. Be sure to keep the original packaging as the it might need to be inspected by the Post Office.

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